Stillagaumish Valley Genealogical Society

2019 Classes

Wednesday, August 14th:
 
  • Thomas MacEntee
    Beginning Genealogy Class  - If you are intrigued by your family history either because you’ve watched those Ancestry ads on television or perhaps you’ve inherited years of research from another relative, Beginning Genealogy will get you started on the road to success! You’ll learn the basics of family history research, develop strong research habits, discover tips and tricks for Ancestry, FamilySearch and other websites, and then take the next steps to continue your genealogy journey!
     
    Outline:
    • Why Do We Care About Family History?
    • Getting Ready: Preparing to Research
    • GPS: Genealogical Proof Standard
    • Slow Down! Dealing with Genealogy Overload
    • Technology and Genealogy
    • Good Genealogy or Bad Genealogy?
    • Locating Genealogy Resources Online and Offline
    • Working with Inherited Research, Family Photos and More
    • Joining the Genealogy Community
    • The Next Step in Your Genealogy Journey
    • Resource List
Thursday, August 15th:
 
  • Angie Bush

    Key Presentations:
    • Direct Line Testing - Y-DNA and mtDNA testing have been around since 1999, but they are not always the easiest tests to use for genealogical research. Learn how to make the most of your Y-DNA and mtDNA test results, and discuss examples of situations where Y-DNA and/or mtDNA information were critical in answering genealogical research questions. Learn how to apply the results of these tests to your family tree.
    • Answering Genealogical Questions with Autosomal DNA - Autosomal DNA testing is the most popular type of DNA testing, and millions have tested with the major companies. However, the results are often overwhelming and application to genealogical research can seem daunting. Learn about the things to evaluate and consider when reviewing your test results and how to apply the information you find to your genealogy.
    • Power Tools to Make the Most of Your DNA Test - The results of your DNA tests provide so much information that it can often be difficult to determine how to keep track of all of the information, and actually apply it to your research. There are several "Power Tools" that can help you to organize and use the information to extend your family tree.
  • Lisa Alzo
    • Using Ethnic Newspapers and Publications for Genealogy Research - Ethnic newspapers and publications can often provide biographical and genealogical clues about immigrant ancestors. This session will show you what types of newspapers and publications exist, where to find these rich resources, how to access them, and what details they contain to help with your genealogy research.
    • Researching Your Eastern European Roots Over Here and Over There - This session will show you how to trace your Eastern European roots on both sides of the ocean. Learn about the best genealogy resources to determine your ancestral village, how to locate and interpret vital and other records found in archives, tips for onsite research, and strategies for maximizing your searches in available online databases.
  • Sara Cochran
    • Who Needed it Anyway? Finding Your Family Without the 1890 Census - The loss of the 1890 Federal census is a source of great frustration for American Genealogists, but all hope is not lost! Learn strategies and gather tips for success in locating your family in other records between the 1880 and 1900 Federal censuses.
    • Grandma Said What? Gathering & Verifying Family Oral History - We will define what oral history is and talk about strategies to interview your family; then, go through the process of verifying a family story.
  • Daniel Earl
    • Spare Me Over: Death, Dying, and Burial Customs in the Colonies - For our ancestors, death was a part of everyday life. This presentation will look at how are ancestors understood and handled the death of loved ones, from religious customs to preparation of the body.
  • Janice Lovelace, Ph.D.
    • Becoming Washington: Who Came to the Northwest and Why - What conditions existed for your ancestors to leave their home and make a journey to the Pacific Northwest? This presentation focuses on the push and pull factors for immigration and settlement in mid-19th to mid-20th centuries.
    • Black Gold: Coal Mining in the Pacific NW - Natural resources, like coal, were abundant in 19th century when Europeans migrated to the Pacific NW. How was coal discovered and who worked in the mines in the late 19th and early 20th centuries? How can you find records about the companies and people involved in this work?
  • Jill Morelli, CG
    • Friedrich Christian Eiler: Scoundrel, Bigamist & More! - Do you have an individual who appeared from nowhere, interacted with an ancestor and disappeared? They leave few clues to their identity. The ability to weigh the evidence and combine the correct fragments of multiple personalities to form a single individual is an important skill for any genealogist. This case study illustrates the technique!
    • The Genealogical Proof Standard According to Sherlock Holmes - Puzzled by the Genealogical Proof Standard? Let’s take a more light-hearted journey and learn what the GPS is and how to apply it to our work. Our work as genealogists is often more similar to that of the famous detective than even we might imagine. Who knew that Sherlock Holmes followed the GPS?
  • Michael Strauss
    • Researching Your Urban Ancestors - Whether researching urban or rural family members several resources can be employed that are shared in common. Some of which may not be available in both settings. These may include; city and business directories, maps, census, tax records, and other primary sources that can be used to document your urban ancestors more effectively.
Friday, August 16th:
 
  • Michael Strauss

    Key Presentations:
    • Researching Your Colonial War Ancestors - Involvement with local militia units was an important part in the life of your colonial ancestors. The militia provided for the common defense, and brought families together in times of crisis. This lecture focuses on a wide variety of genealogical records covering from the early colonial period (in what would become the United States) to the end of the French and Indian War (otherwise known at the Seven Years War), in Europe covering the years of 1607-1763. A number of other armed conflicts including; King Philips War, King George’s War, and the War of Jenkins Ear are some of the armed conflicts that will be highlighted. Genealogical sources will include muster rolls, militia lists, pay documents, published books and manuscripts, and other related materials.
    • A House Divided: Researching your Civil War Ancestors - Sectional differences tore apart the United States in April of 1861. By examining individual records of soldiers, sailors, and marines who served during this late war on both sides of the mason-dixon line can we as historians and genealogists gain a firm understanding of how our ancestors were affected by the Civil War; using Compiled Service Records, Draft Records, Pensions, and other primary sources researching families at this time can be done more effectively.
    • Researching your World War II Ancestors - With the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, 1941 the United States was plunged into another global conflict. On the battlefield and the home front alike, our country mobilized towards war. Researching your WWII Ancestors has some obstacles, but it’s not without rewards. By examining the Official Military Personnel Files in St. Louis, MO and those documents lost or destroyed as a result of the devastating fire in 1973, genealogists learn to search other ways to reconstruct their ancestor’s records. Some other sources include; Draft Registrations, Morning Reports, Submarine War Patrol Reports, and Missing Air Crew Reports. This lecture focuses on all those listed and others to reconstruct those records most affected by the fire.
  • Lisa Alzo
    • Exploring Emigration and Immigration from Both Sides of the Pond - There were number of common “push-pull” factors that prompted mass migration from Europe during the mid/late 1800s and early 1900s. Who stayed? Who left? What factors influenced their decisions? Learn about the common “push-pull” factors behind immigration and emigration, how decisions impacted families and how they influence genealogy research.
  • Sara Cochran
    • Irish Eyes Are Smiling: Finding Vital Records in the land of Sain - Get to know the Irish Civil Registration records! These Birth, Marriage and Death records began country-wide in 1864 and contained a wealth of information about our ancestors. Learn how to access these records right from your own home through multiple websites.
  • Mary Eberle, JD
    • Best Tools for Researching Difficult DNA Matches - Have DNA matches, but no names, let alone trees? Oftentimes, their identities can be found, and your family’s connection to them! Learn about clues to figure out who they are and other important information. DNA testing companies provide many clues. Explore resources to investigate your DNA matches, including free and subscription-based websites.
    • Using DNA for Adoption & Unknown Parentage Work - Adoption and unknown (or misattributed) parentage events—whether recent or in the past—can challenge genealogists. DNA can be a powerful tool for finding birth families. We’ll cover techniques and resources for this work.
  • Jean Wilcox Hibben; PhD, MA
    • Motive, Means, & Opportunity: The Sad Saga of George Richards - This case study of a man whose choices served to confuse his descendants is reconstructed in this lecture. He was there, then gone, then back – see how a variety of records unlocked his real story. See how to locate original records (not all online), separate fact from fiction, and assess evidence for accuracy.
  • Jill Morelli, CG
    • Don't Build Your Own Brick Walls! - Everyone has got them—“brick walls”—those intractable genealogical problems that, in spite of what we do, do not get solved. I discovered that I was the mason building that wall! Let’s cover the top ten “assumptions” I employed to build the wall in the first place and what we can do to tear the wall down. Hard hat ready? Let’s do some demolition!
  • Judy Muhn
    • You CAN Take It With You! Mobile Genealogy Tools - Utilizing the mobile tools of Ancestry.com, RootsMagic, Legacy, Evernote and more, you don’t have to take your huge notebooks of family genealogy with you to the library when doing research. There are many tools that you can take on your computer, tablet or Smartphone!
  • Dave Obee
    • Canadiana's genealogical treasures - The Canadiana website has a vast amount of material for family historians, but not many use it or even know about it. Canadiana's genealogy and local history collection includes local and family histories, telling of pioneering, settlement, and local government in early Canada. This is a guide to the 40 million pages of primary-source documents.
    • Between Friends/ Entre Amis: Relatives across the border - Many Canadians and Americans have family members across that long, undefended border. This talk gives some examples of cross-border ties, along with advice on how to search in the other country. Clues in one country can help solve genealogical mysteries in the other. And yes, DNA testing is helping us to find more relatives.
  • Pam Vestal
    • Filling in the Stories of Our Female Ancestors - For most of recorded time, women didn't leave much of a paper trail, but they still have remarkable stories to tell. We'll look at ways in which local history, the law, politics, cataclysmic events, military records, probate inventories and other resources can bring their hidden stories to light.
  • Katherine R. Willson
    • The New Deal Programs & Projects of the 1930s - During the Great Depression, President Roosevelt instituted dozens of programs and projects geared towards restoring prosperity to Americans. This discussion addresses how those programs directly and indirectly affected our parents and grandparents, and where we might find records mentioning their participation.
    • Social Movements of the 19th Century - This presentation examines the beginnings of the women’s suffrage movement in the U.S., as well as those movements favoring free public education, prison & asylum reform, and temperance. We will discuss the inspiration behind these movements, the records that may indicate your ancestors’ involvement, and where to locate those records.
Saturday, August 17th:
 
  • Thomas MacEntee

    Key Presentations:
    • The 15 Habits of Highly Frugal Genealogists - Learn how savvy genealogists are finding success with 15 basic habits of frugality. You’ll not only find a list of key resources but more importantly you’ll learn how to embrace the “mind set” of finding the best ways to save money while researching your ancestors.
    • Successful Collateral and Cluster Searching - While you may think you’ve hit a brick wall with your research, have you tried using cluster and collateral search strategies to look for an opening? Researching non-direct relations as well as those friends and neighbors in your ancestors’ network can pay off in ways you might not imagine. Learn why researching those in-laws, “shirt-tail cousins” and others who may not be a direct-line ancestor as well as “friends, neighbors and associates” can help you break down your genealogy research brick walls.
    • After You’re Gone: Future Proofing Your Genealogy Research - Have you ever considered what will happen to your years of genealogy research once you’re gone? Learn how to ensure that your hard work carries on. Through a combination of planning, common sense, and new technologies, we’ll review how to create an action plan for preserving your genealogy research.
  • Daniel Earl
    • DNA/201: I Got My Results, Now What? - So you just got your DNA test results back. Now what? Maybe you're not as Irish as you thought, and where is that Native American DNA you grandma always talked about? This lecture will discuss what to do now that you have your results such as how to interpret ethnicity estimates, how to look at cousin matching and DNA circles.
  • Mary Eberle, JD
    • X Marks the Spot: X-DNA for Genealogical Research - Learn when X-DNA can help answer research questions. Know where to find your X-DNA matches. Understand how men and women differently inherit X-DNA. This will unleash the power of X-DNA. We’ll explore several examples where X-DNA provided crucial information to answer the research question.
  • Jean Wilcox Hibben; PhD, MA
    • BEWARE! The Enchanted Forest: Perils & Pitfalls of Online Trees - When is it safe to get information from an online tree? We’ll discuss where they can be found, how to determine reliability, use them for clues to further research, and more. Most online trees can be evaluated with a few simple steps: don’t become victim to the enchantment of an apparent pot of gold. Good for beginner to intermediate researchers.
    • Pandemics & Epidemics: Issues of Politics, Economy, and Religion - Epidemics and Pandemics all affected our ancestors, directly or indirectly. Lifestyles were altered as politics, religion, and economics dictated how disease was handled. They can also explain why a genealogist’s research may have some holes. Various documents, funeral and cemetery records, and ways of handling the dead will also be discussed.
  • Judy Muhn
    • No Dead Ends: Finding Your Way Through Family Roadblocks - No genealogist works their way through their family history without coming across the challenges of what looks like a dead end: no records, unidentified parents and more. Learn about the tools, techniques, and ways of thinking of professional genealogists to find ways to get around road blocks and continue your ancestral journey.
    • Seeking A Higher Source: The Resources of Faith Communities - Key events in our ancestors’ lives were often documented in the faith communities in which they worshipped. Exploring the records and their importance across faith communities, Judy will provide information on the types of records, locations of archives and access to records, and the key ways that these records can enrich your family’s history.
  • Dave Obee
    • A Sense of Place and Time: Putting Ancestors in Context - Meaningful research is not possible unless we understand the local geography and history in the areas where our ancestors lived. They were affected by local events, after all -- they were not living in isolation. This talk explains why certain information is valuable, and how to locate it. It includes examples based on Dave's own research.
  • Pam Vestal
    • Writing Ancestral Stories Your Relatives Will Want to Read - Part of the thrill of genealogy is sharing our discoveries with those we love, so it can be disappointing when our family members and friends have no interest in the subject. However, with good research, thoughtful planning, and a dash of ingenuity, we can create engaging stories designed to entice even the most reluctant readers.
    • Discovering Your Ancestor’s Life in Records of Death - Sometimes the best way to learn about an ancestor's life is to dig into the mountain of paperwork created by his death. We'll explore the surprisingly abundant information that is collected when a death occurs and glimpse just how much these records can reveal, not only about our ancestors' deaths, but also about their lives.
  • Katherine R. Willson
    • Using Maps in Genealogy - There are a vast number of map types that can assist us in our genealogical research and add context to our ancestral stories. This presentation examines both historical and contemporary maps (plat, topographic, insurance, military, railway, etc.) as well as where to find them online and offline.